New Detectives

New Detectives

About the show

World-renowned forensics experts and criminal investigators solve murders and other crimes. New Detectives tells the stories of men and women using science to bring killers to justice - and comfort to their victims' families. The show features the rapidly growing evolution of forensic science as a method to solve the most puzzling crimes. 

X

Upcoming episodes

Dec 11th
100p

Loved to Death

A russian woman is found nude and dead in the bathtub in her toronto apartment. Homicide detectives process the apartment, and transport the woman to the medical examiner’s office. An autopsy is performed, and a forensic odontologist is brought in, as teeth marks were discovered on the woman’s body. The teeth marks were analyzed, and samples were taken. The woman appeared to have several boyfriends, all of whom were questioned, and had teeth molds made to attempt to match to the bite marks on the woman’s body. A perfect match was found, the only evidence linking the man to the murder.
Dec 12th
100p

Critical Evidence

A man discovers skeletal remains lying just outside the african lion safari section of an ontario zoo. An anthropologist assisted forensics professionals in the autopsy to help determine cause of death. The team searching for the victim’s identity employed a bizarre technique of re-hydration to attempt to lift a fingerprint. Once the victim had a name, authorities would have to piece together the cause of death.
Dec 13th
100p

Vanished

An 18-year-old girl is found raped and strangled in a harlem stairwell. Dna is collected from the victim’s body and is compared to that of other rape suspects being held in jail; it doesn’t match. Another girl with a similar description is found dead, and police feel they have a serial killer on their hands. A man’s name is found from the phone records of one of the victims, and authorities would have to attempt to obtain dna sample from the man to prove his guilt.
Dec 14th
400a

Soldier Stories

This show profiles the work of world-renowned forensic experts as they work to tell the stories of the young men who went to war (from the french and indian war to vietnam) and never came back.
Dec 14th
100p

Deadly Chemistry

The show examines cases of poison and deadly chemistry and shows how forensic experts are solving mysterious deaths today and from the past.
Dec 15th
100p

Camera Clues

Forensic photography: Forensic photographers are among the first people at a crime scene, capturing vital clues on film. What do the cameras capture that can't be seen first-hand, and who are the men and women who analyze the camera's clues?
Dec 18th
100p

Web of Clues

Forensic entomology: Bugs have roamed the earth for 250 million years, but their intimate association with death is just now coming to life. The kinds of insects on bodies, along with their stage of development, can pinpoint time of death and help identify victims.
Dec 19th
100p

Without a Trace

Missing person: Approximately 1.8 million americans are reported missing each year. Worldwide, the number of missing persons nearly triples. In addition to pictures on milk cartons, store windows, and in mass mailings, authorities use nationwide computer databases to help locate missing persons or match them with unidentified bodies. Even so, many of the missing are never seen again.
Dec 20th
100p

Short Fuse

Explosives investigations: The crime lab is the place where science meets murder. In new york state, eleanor fowler opened a small package, which as mailed to her home. When she lifted the lid the box exploded killing her instantly. Within minutes, five other bombs exploded proving to be as fatal as the first. The investigation into this serial bombing case became one of the most massive investigations in history.
Dec 21st
400a

Death Grip

Fingerprinting: The identification division of the fbi relies on fingerprints as one of the most effective ways to identify criminals. Fingerprints, along with palmprints and footprints are an indisputable, time-tested method to establish someone's id beyond a shadow of a doubt. Computerization has all but eliminated the old inkpad, and print identification that used to take months now takes minutes.